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THE BOSTON MARATHON: A RUN FOR EQUALITY

Throughout our history as a company, we have been fortunate to create an international community that supports each other.

Inspired by the ever-growing community we created, we made it our ethos to collaborate with different non-profit organizations to, together, with the help of our guests, improve the quality of life of others.

Now, we are proud to announce that we will be running the 2024 Boston Marathon with Team With A Vision, who have long-established history of running and inclusion.

One of the reasons we are most passionate about taking part in this particular marathon is because we strongly believe in equality, and Katherine Switzer  legendary story has inspired us for many years throughout both our personal running journey as well as our individual professional journey.

The hospitality industry which I have worked in for over 30 years of my life ,is predominantly dominated by men. I took it upon myself a long time ago to ensure that my company would break this cycle. I am very proud to be able to say that my current team is made up of 50% women and my management team is lead by two amazing women. 

I want to make a change in the world by helping out everyone that needs it, no matter where they are from and getting to run the Boston marathon with MAVBI is a dream come true.

The History behind the Boston Marathon

Roberta Gibb was the first woman to run the full Boston Marathon in 1966. Gibb, who did not run with an official race number during any of the three years (1966-68) that she was the first female finisher, hid in the bushes near the start until the race began. In 1967, Katherine Switzer did not clearly identify herself as a female on the race application and was issued a bib number. B.A.A. officials tried unsuccessfully to physically remove her from the race once she was identified as a woman. At the time of Switzer’s run, the Amateur Athletics Union (A.A.U.) had yet to formally accept participation of women in long distance running. When the A.A.U. permitted its sanctioned marathons to allow women entry in the fall of 1971, Nina Kuscsik’s 1972 B.A.A. victory the following spring made her the first official champion. Eight women started that race and all eight finished.

We are proud of being able to run the Boston Marathon as partners of MABVI to improve the living conditions of those who need it the most, but we want our reach to be even greater and, to do so, we need your help.

MABVI empowers individuals to continue to lead full lives, whether you are experiencing vision loss or have been blind since youth. Vision rehabilitation, access technology training, volunteer help, counseling, and peer support services are comprehensive, cost-effective, high-quality services that are often life-altering.

Your gift will help support 1400 adults that need vision rehabilitation services. Make an instant impact on those who need it and donate to Team with a Vision.

The Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired

The roots of the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI) stretch back to 1903. MABVI is one of the oldest social service organizations in the U.S. serving adults who are blind or low-vision. Helen Keller was one of MABVI’s early leaders. MABVI’s commitment to promote independence and self-determination for blind adults is rooted in her values.

All funds raised support MABVI’s statewide vision rehabilitation services, including 34 low-vision support groups, Assistive Technology and Training Centers, and 400 volunteers matched 1:1 with blind individuals.

Blindness does not have to mean the stopping of activities that a person enjoys.

DONATE TO TEAM WITH A VISION

The TPC Foundation

A Dream of Sharing